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Since its premiere in 1937, Carl Orff's bawdy rollick through the fields and swamps of Love, Lust, and Booze has commanded the kind of following that rock bands dream of. Among the zipped up, stiffly starched giants of the choral repertoire, Carmina Burana is the bad girl who can't seem to keep her blouse buttoned.

It's important for a chorus to convey messages through marketing communications that are consistent with the brand conveyed through its musicmaking. A periodic brand audit—conducted either by a consultant or done yourselves following the simple steps below—will help bring you into alignment.

In his recent book egonomics: what makes ego our greatest asset (or most expensive liability), co-author Steven Smith explores the power of ego to enhance communication and organizational effectiveness. Because choruses, like many arts organizations, are comprised of community boards and often little or no staff—all led by an artistic director whose vision, talent, and charisma play a major role in galvanizing and motivating the activities of singers, board, and staff—the quality of communication among them is vital to organizational health. Smith elaborates on how ego can be harnessed to foster effective communication.

The goal of a concert is not to perform great music well, but to co-create personally relevant experiences together inside the music.

Marilyn Horne, one of America's most celebrated opera stars, decided to shine the spotlight on the next generation.

There are a few things we could all benefit from knowing about how a chorus functions as a nonprofit organization.

Tenor Michael Lichtenauer describes his unlikely journey from a desk job in Kansas to a career as a professional singer with Chanticleer and then the Los Angeles Master Chorale—and the lessons he learned along the way.

The evidence just keeps rolling in: Choral singing is good for your health.

Choral conductor Tom Hall pulls back the veil on several well-loved choral works in this interview.

Composer David Lang tells about the creative vision of Bang on a Can: Take concerts apart and put them back together again so that music can be heard with fresh ears.

Richard Westenburg, the founder of New York's famed chorus and orchestra, Musica Sacra, died of colon cancer on February 20, 2008. Westenburg had been an important fixture on the New York scene for more than 40 years.

As singers age, what used to be easy becomes harder—sustaining the high notes, singing through a phrase on one breath, doing a smooth crescendo and decrescendo. Here's a look at several strategies for overcoming the challenges of an aging voice.

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