Articles

How can choruses be welcoming hosts – particularly to new audiences – while still creating concert experiences that everyone can enjoy?

To better understand how to engage new audiences and deepen relationships with current patrons, consider wiping the slate clean and taking a fresh approach. Reexamine old assumptions. Redefine terms. Reacquaint yourself with your audience. Allow yourself to dream. 

This article is part of a series highlighting new choral repertoire that can be used by a wide range of choirs to address different community issues.

Chorus America communications manager Mike Rowan represented our organization and the choral field at Arts Advocacy Day 2018, and came back with some insider tips on how the process works in our nation’s capital.

In honor of International Women’s Day, we asked some of the leading women in the Chorus America community to tell us about the women who inspire their work. Here are their answers.

So, what do you do when you have a large amount of people who consistently don’t open your emails?

If you can’t remember the last time you cleaned your email list, odds are that it is due for some attention.

As marketing evolves, relevance is becoming more and more important. Sending your patrons and prospective patrons the most relevant communications is key to not only selling tickets but to engaging them in your brand.

Choruses seek to foster an open, welcoming culture, but some practices can exclude and cause pain for transgender singers. Here are some steps your chorus can take to avoid them.

For any chorus, finding the right repertoire can be an imposing task. But the process is especially difficult for community choruses. Why is the search so hard for them, how do they deal with the obstacles, and what more can be done to help these ensembles locate the music that’s right for them?

In our Winter 2017-18 issue of The Voice, Chorus America spoke to conductors and publishers about how to address the challenge of finding quality repertoire for community choruses. So what are some specific pieces that these publishers and composers would recommend for these groups? We asked a wide range of publishers and composers in the field to recommend one work from their own catalogue that they felt is especially suited to community choruses. The list we compiled represents a broad spectrum of cultural traditions, orchestrations, and voicings—including links to websites for more information when available.

How can choruses foster a more inclusive culture for transgender singers? This list of resources accompanies our article from the Winter 2017-18 issue of the Voice on welcoming transgender singers.

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