History

Bach’s Rhetorical Intuition

A Response to Mattheson’s Criticism of Ich hatte viel Bekümmernis

This final issue before the American Choral Review transfers to a new home at the National Collegiate Choral Organization features a study of Bach’s use of rhetorical devices in Cantata Ich hatte viel Bekummnernis, BWV 21 and an interview with two singers from the ensemble New York Polyphony.

Franz Liszt and Hector Berlioz

Conducting, Interpretation and Two Underappreciated Legacies

This edition of the American Choral Review focuses on the discipline and practice of conducting.

Apologies, but you don't have permission to view this page.

Thanks for your interest. You must be a Chorus America member (or derive membership benefits from your relationship to a member organization) to view this content.

If you are currently a member, please log in or create a site user account for access to members-only content. If you are not currently a member, We invite you to join to access all Chorus America’s resources and benefits.

Commemorating the 19th Amendment: Singing about Suffrage and Exploring Intersectionality

“Awake! Awake! Ye sisters all,” is the opening line to the “Suffrage Marching Song,” by Fanny Connable and Florence Livingston Lent, composed in 1914 to benefit the Equal Suffrage Cause. Like many political movements, the suffrage movement was inherently linked with music, making the 2020 centennial of the 19th Amendment’s ratification a natural programmatic theme. Choruses across the U.S. are honoring this anniversary with new events and commissions featuring women’s voices, including premieres happening this weekend.

A Century of Affirming African American Musical Identity

(NANM board members in 1941, Foster Memorial Hall, Pittsburgh. Pictured are Blanche K. Thompson, Josephine Inness, Henry L. Grant, Mary Cardwell Dawson, Clarence Hayden Wilson, and Florence B. Price. Photo credit: Carnegie Museum of Art, Charles "Teenie" Harris Archive)

Sharing the Breadth and Beauty of Jewish Choral Music

The Zamir Chorale of Boston is launching a new online resource intended to share the breadth and beauty of the repertoire that has been its specialty for 50 years. The chorale’s founder, Joshua Jacobson, explains why he believes choral music from Jewish traditions will be a welcome discovery for choruses of all kinds.

Anniversary Planning: Lessons Learned

We asked the chorus leaders we interviewed for our 2018-19 Winter Voice article “Cause for Celebration” to pass along practical lessons learned from their experience planning anniversary seasons. The wisdom they shared ranges from knowing when to start to knowing when to stop.

Cause for Celebration: Why Choruses See Major Anniversaries as Major Opportunities

North American choruses are anticipating a wave of major anniversaries in the coming years, and their leaders are hard at work preparing to mark the occasions. The most thoughtful celebrations honor a chorus’s past achievements, while laying the groundwork for an even stronger future.

Sing Skillfully Unto the Lord: The Modern Gospel Chorus Movement in Chicago

In early 20th-century Chicago, the intersection of classical and gospel church traditions gave birth to the modern gospel chorus movement. This history has made Chicago the gospel choir capital of the world—and continues to have an impact on ensemble singing today.

Morten Lauridsen and His Illuminating Impact

In the last decade of the 20th century, the composer Morten Lauridsen wrote a series of pieces while serving a residency for the Los Angeles Master Chorale that have had a lasting and international impact. This year the choral world celebrates the 20th anniversary of the largest of these milestones, Lux Aeterna. What has given the Lauridsen aesthetic its power to connect and attract? And why does it continue to move performers, composers, and listeners?

Get News