Conducting

How Important is Sight-Singing?

It’s a question many singers ask themselves, especially right before their chorus audition. What are conductors really looking for? Is it perfection?

David Hamilton’s Music for Unaccompanied Choir

Research Memorandum Series No. 204

This article is a companion to Research Memorandum Series No. 202 and 203, also providing insight into the work of David Hamilton, a prolific composer and music educator from New Zealand.

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Carrying on a Family Tradition of Carol Writing

As a young girl, Abbie Betinis noticed that singing “Caroling, Caroling” during the holidays always brought tears to her grandpa’s eyes. Later she would learn that the famous carol was one of many composed by her great uncle Alfred Burt, who was carrying on a family tradition of carol writing begun by his father, the Rev. Bates Burt. In 2001, Betinis, by then a composer herself, decided to pick up the family carol writing tradition.

Conducting Masterclass Alumni: The Beat Goes On

Over the years, many talented conductors have participated in Chorus America’s Masterclasses. The Voice asked past Fellows to share where they are now, and how their Masterclass experience has shaped their different professional paths.

David Hamilton’s Music for Choir and Keyboard or Solo Instruments

Research Memorandum Series No. 203

This article is a companion to Research Memorandum Series No. 202 Winter 2012/13, “David Hamilton’s Music for Choir and Instrumental Ensemble”, also providing insight into the work of this prolific composer and music educator from New Zealand.

Movement in Rehearsal

Making time to incorporate movement exercises during rehearsal can be a challenge, but a number of conductors are finding that it makes a real difference in the way their groups sing.

More Tips for Memorizing Music

The article "Should Choruses Memorize Their Music?" shares memorization techniques that choruses have found helpful. In this followup piece, Gary Holt, artistic director of the San Diego Gay Men's Chorus, expands on how he gets his singers "off book" quickly and efficiently.

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Should Choruses Memorize Their Music?

Memorizing music can be daunting, but choruses that require it report that their singers connect better with the conductor, with the music, and ultimately with the audience. The memorization techniques that worked for them can help ease the process.

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